TGIF – CheckMark

Tech Goodies in Focus – CheckMark
Hello staff,
I hope you will get to enjoy this long weekend.  And find a veteran to hug to say thank you.  Hopefully this veteran is someone you know.  But if you are the sort that is OK with hugging a stranger, then that is your prerogative.
It looks like the subject of this week’s TGIF is another feedback tool.  CheckMark is a Chrome extension that allows quick and easy feedback on student writing in Google Docs.  Yes, this only works in the Chrome browser.  You can get the extension here.
What does this extension do and how does it work?  When you are in a Google Doc and the extension is enabled (so the icon looks greenInline image 4 and not greyInline image 3), when you highlight a portion of text this box appears.
Inline image 1
Each button corresponds to a non-editable comment that is automatically created as you click the button.
  • Here is a demo of the tool in action.
  • Here is a list of the icons and their corresponding comments.  If this tool intrigues you then you might want a handy reference of the buttons and their comments.  I picture this list being printed out and taped (or super glued, or stapled) to the bottom of your computer monitor bezel for easy reference, as shown below.  Please don’t super glue or staple this list to your computer.
  • Inline image 2
And I understand the limitations of this tool.  I will not be using this tool with the current comments.  The comments don’t apply to science lab reports well enough.  I would love to see this tool have editable comments.  So I decided to ask the EdTechTeam.  Here was the short conversation.
Mr. Davis to EdTechTeam:  I love this tool and I am sharing it with my staff this week. Is there going to be a way to change the comments? I would love to modify this for my science classes.
 
EdTechTeam (by way of Chris Craft):  I can’t say too much but keep your eyes on my Twitter (@crafty184). There may or may not be a big announcement coming after the holidays. 😉
 
Chris Craft, I am watching.  And I have my fingers crossed for editable comments.  Really, I do.  See?  Disclaimer:  The image that follows are not my real fingers.
  Inline image 5
I can really see the potential in this tool for giving feedback to students without the teacher having to type the most common comments over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over again.  (Reminder… copy and paste can be such a useful tool sometimes, as shown above).

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